Workshops

The following workshops have been accepted at ESEC/FSE 2009. For details, please visit the workshops' websites.

 

 

Joint ERCIM Workshop on Software Evolution and International Workshop on Principles of Software Evolution (IWPSE-EVOL 2009)

To celebrate the 10th anniversary of IWPSE and the 5th anniversary of EVOL, we are organising a joint workshop (IWPSE-EVOL 2009) at ESEC/FSE 2009 where people from both communities can meet to discuss the latest trends and developments in software evolution. The special theme of this anniversary edition is "The Future of Software Evolution". We particularly welcome submissions that take a historical perspective on a particular facet of software evolution research, practice or education, argue for the current challenges, and speculate on what the future might bring. Other topics sought include, but are not limited to application areas, paradigms, technical aspects, formal aspects, managerial aspects, empirical studies, practical aspects and industrial applicability.

Organizers:

  • Tom Mens (Université de Mons)
  • Kim Mens (Université catholique de Louvain)
  • Michel Wermelinger (The Open University, UK)
  • Dirk Deridder (Vrije Universiteit Brussel)

Website: http://ssel.vub.ac.be/iwpse-evol/

Meeting Date: 24-25 August 2009

International Workshop on Open Component Ecosystems (IWOCE 2009)

The continuous and independent evolution of readily available components suggested that open platforms can better accommodate and manage software components as normally happens in systems like Libre Software Distributions, Eclipse, and J2EE, just to mention a few. The critical mass and the consequent evolutionary pressure represented by such software components requires organizations, such as companies, research groups, and opensource communities, to collaborate on custom software development, implementation and shared services. The capability of modeling, analyzing, and predicting the component behavior during these stages is intrinsically difficult and requires techniques, algorithms, and methods which are both expressive and computationally convenient in order to be engineered and conveyed in practical projects. The goal of the workshop is to gather together both researchers and practitioners active in open source software development, software composition, algorithms, constraint programming, and model-driven engineering to discuss, debate, exchange ideas, and outline common solutions to the problem of static and dynamic component aggregations in software ecosystems.

Organizers:

  • Roberto Di Cosmo (University Paris Diderot)
  • Paola Inverardi (University of L'Aquila)

Website: http://www.iwoce.org

Meeting Date: 24 August 2009

Second International Workshop on Social Software Engineering and Applications (SoSEA 2009)

Social software has emerged as one of the most exciting and important phenomenon in today's software and business arena. With social software, individuals can interact, share, and meet other individuals, presumably with similar interests, forming large data, knowledge, and user bases. Social software engineering, in turn, can be defined as the application of processes, methods, and tools to enable community-driven creation, management, deployment, and use of software in online environments. The social software movement can be regarded as both a challenge and an opportunity for software development. On the one hand, social software itself brings own kinds of challenges such as data sensitivity, content legality, scalability, and performance. On the other hand, the social software movement is apparently causing a fundamental change in the way software engineering is practiced, benefiting from the technologies and experiences gained from Web 2.0 and the expectations of the forthcoming Web 3.0. In the near future, various forms of social software development will become a reality. Examples include software mashups, intelligent context-aware software downloads, and online cooperative CASE tools. Such a cooperative model of software development would also meet the challenges of contemporary software engineering such as outsourcing, cooperative software engineering, and open source software.

Organizers:

  • Imed Hammouda (Tampere University of Technology)
  • Filippo Lanubile (University of Bari)
  • Jan Bosch (Intuit Inc., USA)
  • Mehdi Jazayeri (University of Lugano)

Website: http://tutopen.cs.tut.fi/sosea09/

Meeting Date: 24 August 2009

Workshop on Software Integration and Evolution at Runtime (SINTER 2009)

Modern ICT solutions are often highly distributed and dynamic systems-of-systems (SoS). They provide critical backbone infrastructure for organizations and are increasingly subjected to stringent availability and dependability requirements. Availability implies that SoS must be reconfigured, updated, and otherwise maintained during runtime while retaining their overall operational integrity. This requires that much of the adaptation, integration, configuration and testing activities typically performed offline, during development time, now have to be done on-line, during runtime.
Current component-based runtime platforms such as Service Oriented Architectures realize the technological foundations for runtime reconfiguration and evolution. However, software engineering methodology has not kept pace with the rapid leap forward in platform technology, so that adequate methods, techniques and tools for managing runtime integration and evolution are not yet available. Such methodology comprises component adaptation, reconfiguration, integration and acceptance testing, health monitoring, fault diagnosis, and reliability assessment for the running system. This workshop is intended to discuss and address the challenges and pitfalls that are raised through runtime integration and evolution and associated methods, techniques, and tools, required to build and maintain highly distributed, dynamic and adaptable ICT infrastructures.

Organizers:

  • Hans-Gerhard Gross (Delft University of Technology)
  • Jan Tretmans (Embedded Systems Institute and Radboud University)
  • Marco Lormans (Logica)

Website: http://swerl.tudelft.nl/bin/view/Sinter

Meeting Date: 25 August 2009

Workshop on Context-Aware Software Technology and Applications (CASTA 2009)

Context awareness is the notion of computer systems that dynamically adapt their behavior to a changing environment. Such applications are useful in many situations ranging from general human-computer interaction over business process execution to healthcare or logistics. However, mainstream programming languages and tools do not offer dedicated support for adaptive properties. Additionally, as context awareness is an application requirement, it should already be addressed at the modeling level. Recent developments in dynamic programming languages enable context awareness technically, but the application-oriented communities have had little opportunity to benefit from these insights. Vice versa, certain application requirements concerning context could probably be met better by specially-tailored programming and modeling techniques. This workshop attempts to bring together researchers from the disparate communities to exchange ideas, establish a common research program, and foster new collaborations.

Organizers:

  • Oscar Nierstrasz (University of Bern)
  • Susanne Patig (University of Bern)
  • John Plaice (University of New South Wales)
  • Jorge Ressia (University of Bern)

Website: http://casta.unibe.ch/

Meeting Date: 24 August 2009

First International Workshop on the Quality of Service-Oriented Software Systems (QUASOSS 2009)

The 1st International Workshop on the Quality of Service-Oriented Software Systems (QUASOSS) brings together researchers and practitioners to discuss the state-of-the-art in modelling and evaluating the extra-functional properties of service-oriented software systems. These include for example performance, reliability, security, and energy consumption. While concepts for service design, composition, provisioning, and management are currently maturing, a systematic engineering approach to service-oriented software with predictable quality-of-service (QoS) is still missing. QUASOSS aims at closing this gap by stimulating research and technology transfer at the intersection of serviceoriented computing and quality-of-service engineering.

Organizers:

  • Paul Petterson (Mälardalen University)
  • Heiko Koziolek (ABB Corporate Research, Germany)
  • Petr Hnetynka (Charles University)

Website: http://dsrg.mff.cuni.cz/quasoss/

Meeting Date: 25 August 2009

Specification and Verification of Component-based Systems (SAVCBS 2009)

This workshop is concerned with how formal (i.e., mathematical) techniques can be or should be used to establish a suitable foundation for the specification and verification of component-based systems. Component-based systems are a growing concern for the software engineering community. Specification and reasoning techniques are urgently needed to permit composition of systems from components. Component-based specification and verification is also vital for scaling advanced verification techniques such as extended static analysis and model checking to the size of real systems. The workshop will consider formalization of both functional and non-functional behavior, such as performance or reliability. We bring together researchers and practitioners in the areas of component-based software and formal methods to address the open problems in modular specification and verification of systems composed from components. We are interested in bridging the gap between principles and practice. The intent of bringing participants together at the workshop is to help form a community-oriented understanding of the relevant research problems and help steer formal methods research in a direction that will address the problems of component-based systems. For example, researchers in formal methods have only recently begun to study principles of object-oriented software specification and verification, but do not yet have a good handle on how inheritance can be exploited in specification and verification. Other issues are also important in the practice of component-based systems, such as concurrency, mechanization and scalability, performance (time and space), reusability, and understandability. The participants will brainstorm about these and related topics to understand both the problems involved and how formal techniques may be useful in solving them.

Organizers:

  • Jonathan Aldrich (Carnegie Mellon University)
  • Mike Barnett (Microsoft Research, USA)
  • Dimitra Giannakopoulou (RIACS/NASA Ames Research Center, USA)
  • Gary T. Leavens (University of Central Florida)
  • Natasha Sharygina (University of Lugano)

Website: http://www.eecs.ucf.edu/SAVCBS/

Meeting Date: 25 August 2009